Friday, January 02, 2009

Smoking allowed

We had lunch at a cafeteria south of Dallas.

There must be different rules in Texas than in Colorado... I don't think there is a single restaurant in Colorado that allows smoking. I didn't see anyone smoking, however. They must have all come from Colorado, unprepared for that unexpected freedom.

7 comments:

Adam Singer said...

That is disgusting they allow smoking indoors at any establishment. I for one will never eat inside a place that allows smoking. Didn't even know this was legal anymore.

The Lone Beader said...

Oh, yea, it is a state law... I am so glad they banned smoking in bars and restaurants in Massachusetts. But, when I go home to Pennsylvania to visit my family, they allow smoking! It is so nasty, but there are a few states I imagine will never vote to change that law.

Hannah said...

Over here, they allow smoking just about everywhere except for shopping malls. I've gotten used to it I think. One time I do remember at a little stall we were eating at, several tables around us had people smoking. I made a "yucky" face or something because I didn't like the smoke. One man apparently noticed, apologized and put his cigarette out! That was a first, and probably a last, but he got a big smile from me. :)

Shilingi-Moja said...

Virginia leaves it up to local governments. There are smokers all over Richmond. It's the influence of tobacco money -- Philip Morris is huge here. It's VERY unpleasant to try to eat Mexican food and smell smoke from across the divider.

lifeinstuttgart said...

I believe it was outlawed in Germany everywhere except for Bavaria last year. As a lifelong smoker who quit a few years ago I find it a Godsend! I now can smell cigarette smoke about half a mile away and I get nauseous.

I'm not trying to be self-righteous, just healthy. I know what it's like to be addicted to nicotine!

Julie Layne said...

It's up to the city governments in Texas. In Arlington, it's banned (although I think there are certain exemptions for some types of establishments), but in Mansfield it's not yet. We can tell a difference when we go out to eat in each. I imagine their time is coming, as well as most other cities in Texas. It's a sea change, and traditional, small town areas are slower to adapt for various reasons, I imagine.

Anonymous said...

Since July of 2008, Pennsylvania does not allow smoking in public places - yippee!